Night out with PACCT at the Theatre

Night out with PACCT at the Theatre

Join PACCT at the Theatre!They have purchased 8 pairs of tickets to Face Off Theatre Company‘s production of PIPELINE on Saturday night (July 17th) at 7:30 pm to share with our friends and followers! Here’s how you can enter to win a pair: FIRST, “Follow” PACCT Board here on Facebook. Once you’ve done that, leave a comment here on this post with your answer to this question: How many times (approximately) this month have you heard or seen the phrase “School to Prison Pipeline”? Drawing closes at 5 pm Thursday, July 15. WINNERS WILL BE SELECTED AT RANDOM and announced here at 7 and notified via messenger to arrange to have tickets delivered.

Face Off Theatre Company

This is awesome! Thank you for your support! For anyone wanting to know more about this show, here’s links to a blog post and to a radio interview with the show’s director and one of the leads.
Kalamazoo County COVID-19 Update

Kalamazoo County COVID-19 Update

KALAMAZOO, MI – The following is an update from the Kalamazoo County Health & Community Services Department (KCHCSD) for COVID19-related information:

Kalamazoo County Covid-19 Update

COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic Hours

KCHCSD continues to offer COVID-19 vaccines at the health department, located at 311 E. Alcott Street. Hours have been extended to Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

There is no cost to individuals for vaccination, no ID is required, and no appointment is needed. You will be able to select which vaccine brand you would like to receive: Pfizer, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson.

COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for anyone 12 years or older. Anyone under 18 years old needs to be accompanied by a parent or guardian when being vaccinated.

To date, 61% of Kalamazoo County residents over the age of 12 have received at least one dose of the COVID- 19 vaccine and 57% have completed the vaccination series.

Homebound COVID-19 Vaccinations

The Kalamazoo County Area Agency on Aging was awarded a grant to provide COVID-19 Vaccines to the homebound population living in Kalamazoo County. To Schedule a homebound vaccine appointment, please call 269-373-5239 or check the health department’s website, www.kalcounty.com/covid19vaccine for availability. Limited RSVPs available. Homebound Criteria: Individual who is normally unable to leave the home unassisted, and for whom leaving takes considerable and taxing effort.

COVID-19 Website Information

  •   Community Vaccine Clinics
    KCHCSD has started to include available community vaccine clinic options on the website www.kalcounty.com/covid19vaccine under the Calendar & Events section on the right-hand side. People may also find where to locate a COVID-19 vaccine by visiting www.vaccines.gov. The COVID-19 Call Center is also available at 269-373-5200 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. to assist with questions.
  •   Report Out of State or Veterans Affairs (VA) Office Vaccinations
    If you were vaccinated in another state or at the VA Office and want to make sure “your vaccination counts here in Kalamazoo County,” you may now complete an online form with the health department. This will allow your vaccination information to be entered into the Michigan Care Improvement Registry (MCIR). After completing the form, the health department staff will contact you within two weeks to collect additional information. If you are unable to complete the online form, call 269-373- 5200 and select the option for the COVID-19 Call Center for assistance. Veterans who receive care at a non-VA primary care office can also contact their personal physician to update their records. If you have registered for the MI Shot to Win Sweepstakes, you will not be eligible to win unless your vaccination is registered within MCIR. Contact the local health department or your non-VA primary care provider so your vaccination can be entered into the MCIR database, where verification of vaccination status will be pulled. Register for the Shot to Win sweepstakes at www.mishottowin.com. The first round of winners will be announced this week
  •   COVID-19 Vaccination Card Replacement
    If you have lost or misplaced your COVID-19 Vaccine Card, then you can request a copy of your immunization records from your primary care provider (doctor’s office) or the health department by completing an online form. The health department cannot replace your COVID-10 Vaccine Card, but your official immunization records will document information about the vaccines received.
  •   County Data Dashboards
    The health department will be making changes to the COVID-19 data dashboards by linking directly to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) COVID-19 Data Dashboard. The MDHHS COVID-19 Data Dashboard includes county-specific data for cases and deaths, including county-level demographics. This website change is occurring to make data more accessible for Kalamazoo County residents by having one resource to locate information, reduce duplication of the same data information publicly displayed, and better utilize county resources. The county health department already links directly to the MDHHS COVID-19 Vaccine Dashboard for vaccine administered information. The health department encourages residents to visit both MDHHS COVID-19 dashboards for state and county specific information.

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Bill To End The Criminalization Of Students, Invest In Counselors, Safer Environment For Kids

Bill To End The Criminalization Of Students, Invest In Counselors, Safer Environment For Kids

 

Kalamazoo, MI –PACCT, a  local grassroots organization in Kalamazoo, MI calling for defunding police and reinvesting monies that are productive, supportive and healing for students in Kalamazoo Public Schools. A PACCT organizer shared, “Long overdue relief and liberation for our most vulnerable youth in our education system, BIPOC and LGBTQI+ youth.

https://www.change.org/p/kalamazoo-public-schools-end-police-presence-in-kalamazoo-public-schools

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley (MA-07) and Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT), along with Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (MN-05), Congressman Jamaal Bowman (NY-16), and Senator Tina Smith (D-MN), unveiled the Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act, much needed legislation that would help disrupt the school-to-confinement pathway (school to prison pipeline), invest in safe and nurturing school climates that support all students and bring an end to the over-policing of our nation’s K-12 schools.

The legislation is informed by Rep. Pressley’s People’s Justice Guarantee, her visionary resolution to transform the American criminal legal system that calls for schools to create safe and nurturing environments that provide all students with the opportunity to heal, thrive and reach their highest potential.

“Every student deserves to learn in a setting free from fear, but when our education system is intertwined with the criminal legal system, students of color, LGBTQ+ students, and students with disabilities are disproportionately criminalized for normal childhood behavior and are put on a pathway to confinement,” said Rep. Pressley. “Our bill would address this by shifting federal resources away from school police and investing in culturally responsive nurses, mental health professionals, and other trauma-informed staff that are proven to help our youth grow and reach their full potential. We must root out systemic oppression everywhere it exists—including in our schools—and I thank my colleagues for their partnership in this effort.”

“Right now, too many students, and often kids of color or with disabilities, are arrested by police in schools. The classroom should be a safe place to learn, and the data shows that having counselors and other licensed professionals on staff actually leads to better educational outcomes,” said Sen. Murphy. “I’m re-introducing legislation that would give school districts new resources to increase the presence of support personnel in schools so kids are arrested less and have qualified professionals around to address disciplinary issues in a way that makes students feel supported. It’s just one way we can start to chip away at the racial inequities in our educational system and make sure all kids have a safe place to learn and grow.”

The data shows that counselors, social workers, psychologists and other trained professionals actually improve social and educational outcomes for kids in schools—whereas the involvement of police in schools leads to the criminalization of students, particularly students of color and students with disabilities. The Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act would prohibit the use of federal funds to increase police presence in schools and instead provide $5 billion in new grant funding to help schools hire more counselors social workers, and other behavioral health personnel and implement services in schools that create positive and safe climates for all students.

The Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act:

  • Prohibits the use of federal funds for maintaining police in schools: Since 1999, the federal government has spent more than $1 billion to support the increased presence of police in schools. However, evidence does not show that this investment has improved student outcomes and school safety. This legislation would prohibit federal funds to support the hiring, maintaining, or training of police officers in K-12 schools and instead divert that funding toward the many other uses related to school safety within applicable grant programs.
  • Invests billions to help schools hire counselors, social workers, and other trauma-informed support personnel necessary to create safe and inclusive learning environments: The legislation helps districts build safe and inclusive schools by establishing a $5 billion grant program to support the hiring of counselors, social workers, nurses, school psychologists, and other personnel. Further, the grant program helps districts implement strategies to improve school climate, such as school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports, and invest in trauma-informed services and professional development. As more school districts choose to move away from policies that criminalize students and push them out of school, this historic investment will ensure districts have the necessary resources to provide students with the supports they need to feel safe in school and thrive.
  • Incentivizes states and districts to bring an end to the criminalization of young people,  particularly Black, Native American and Latino students, immigrant students, students with disabilities, LGBTQ+ students and other historically marginalized students and instead invest in safe and nurturing environments where all students can thrive.

“Counselors, nurses, social workers, and educators belong in schools. Police do not,” said Senator Warren. “Our bill will bring us one step closer to ending the militarization of our public schools that disproportionately hurts Black and Brown students, ending the school-to-prison pipeline, and ensuring we give every child the resources they need to feel safe and thrive.”

“Every single student deserves a quality education, and the support to make that possible. But in districts across America, educational outcomes are radically unequal, particularly for children of color and kids with disabilities. In my hometown of Minneapolis, black students are 41% of the student population, but make up three quarters of all suspensions. At one middle school in my district, African American students are 338% more likely to be suspended than their white peers, according to the most recent data. Kids need support, not punishment. I am proud to join this bicameral effort to invest in social workers, counselors and personnel in schools to make sure our most vulnerable kids have the support they need,” said Rep. Omar.

“Stationing police officers in places of learning creates an environment of criminalization from an early age — making it more challenging for our children to focus on their learning, growth, and unlocking their full potential,” said Rep. Bowman. “When we put an officer in a school, we’re sending a message that our children require surveillance. When we put a counselor in a school, we’re sending a message that our children deserve nurturing and support. The emotional, mental, and social trauma of the past year and beyond makes the Counseling Not Criminalization Act even more urgent. Our Black and brown students have shouldered a disproportionate burden during the pandemic, and we know they face a disproportionate amount of policing and criminalization in school. Let’s act now to decrease police presence and provide our schools with resources for counseling and mental health support students deserve.”

“We need to root out systemic oppression in schools. This challenge might seem insurmountable, but there are clear next steps on the path forward,” said Senator Smith. “We should start by removing police from schools and hiring more school counselors, social workers, and other behavioral health personnel to improve school culture and outcomes for students. By transforming the way that schools approach discipline, we can decrease the criminalization of all students, especially students of color and students with disabilities.”

This week, Congresswoman Pressley submitted testimony to the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Racial Equity, Civil Rights, and Inclusion in which she urged lawmakers to prioritize legislation that will dismantle the school-to-confinement pathway by reallocating funding from school-based law enforcement and investing that money in culturally responsive nurses, mental health professionals, and other trauma-informed staff.

The legislation has the support of a broad coalition of advocacy groups, including, at the national level:

A Black Education Network; A Little Piece of Life; Advancement Project National Office; Advocating for Kids, Inc; American Association for People with Disabilities; Alliance for Educational Justice; American Civil Liberties Union; Anti Police-Terror Project; Autistic Self Advocacy Network; Aztlan Media – Launch 2024; Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law; BiNet USA; Black Parallel School Board; Blacks in Law Enforcement of America; Blue Future; Blue Hills Civic Association; Breaking the Chains of Your Mind; CASA; Center for Disability Rights; Center for Learning Equity; Children’s Haven: A Place of Healing and Hope, Inc.; Children’s Defense Fund; Children’s Law Center, Inc.; Chispa; Church World Service; CLASP A New Deal for Youth Changemakers; Clearinghouse on Women’s Issues; Coalition of Labor Union Women, AFL-CIO; Committee for Children; Communities for Just Schools Fund; Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice; Critical Exposure; Deep Center; Defending Rights & Dissent; Dignity in Schools; Disability Rights Advocates; Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund; Drug Policy Alliance; Education Justica Alliance; Ella Baker Center for Human Rights; EveryBlackGirl, Inc.; Feminist Majority Foundation; First Focus Campaign for Children; Girls Inc.; GLSEN; Health in Justice Action Lab; Hispanic Federation; Hour Children; Human Rights Campaign; Intercultural Development Research Association; Justice for Families; Justice Strategies; Justice Teams Network; Juvenile Law Center; LatinoJustice PRLDEF; Los Angeles United School District; Leaders Igniting Transformation; League of Women Voters of the United States; Legal Aid Justice Center; Mommieactivist and Sons; MomsRising; NAACP; NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Inc.; NAMINYS Criminal Justice Committee; National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity; National Black Justice Coalition; National Center for Learning Disabilities; National Center for Youth Law; National Council of Churches; National Crittenton; National Disability Rights Network (NDRN); National Down Syndrome Congress; National Education Association; National Equality Action Team; National Immigration Law Center; National Juvenile Justice Network; National Women’s Law Center; New Athens Creative, Inc.; Next Level Vision, Inc.; Open Society Policy Center; Parents Organized for Public Education; Polemics: Journal of the Workingclass Struggle and National Writers Union; Policing and Social Justice Project; Poverty & Race Research Action Council; Project KnuckleHead; Public Advocacy for Kids; Public Justice; RACCE; Rebuilding Independence My Style; Sociedad Latina; Southern Coalition for Justice; Southern Poverty Law Center Action Fund; SPACEs In Action; Stand for Children; Strategies for Youth; Students for Sensible Drug Policy; The Advocacy Institute; The Black Police Experience; The Center for Law and Social Policy; The Center for Popular Democracy; The Choice Program at UMBC; The Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates; The Daniel Initiative; The Education Trust; The Gathering for Justice; The Institute for Compassion in Justice; The Justice Roundtable; The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights; The National Black Child Development Institute; The National Parents Union; The School Social Work Association of America; The Sentencing Project; United Methodist Women; Urban Youth Collaborative; Vday; Who Speaks For Me; Women’s Leadership Project; Working Narratives; Young Voices; Youth Over Guns; YWCA USA;

It also has the support of a coalition of local organizations, including Arkansas Community Organizations; Baltimore People’s Climate Movement; Baltimore Police Free Schools Coalition; Brighton Park Neighborhood Council; Black & Pink Massachusetts; California Children’s Trust; Center for Children’s Advocacy (CT); Center for Youth & Community Leadership in Education; Clevelanders Against Federal Policing; Collierville Community Justice; CT Students for a Dream; DC Prep PrepNext and ANC 1A07; DeCarcerate Memphis; Disability Rights Oregon; Education Law Center (PA); End Mass Incarceration Georgia Network; Equality California; Faith in New Jersey; Faith in Texas; Families and Friends of Louisiana’s Incarcerated Children; Family Law Practice Clinic (CUNY School of Law); Florida Student Power Network; Gwinnett Parent Coalition to Dismantle the School to Prison Pipeline; Hilton Head for Peace; Institute for Compassion in Justice (KY); Just City Memphis; Kentucky Student Voice Team; Lehigh Valley Stands Up; LAUSD; Living United for Change in Arizona; Make the Road Nevada; Make the Road New York; March for Our Lives DC; Next Level Vision DC; Nollie Jenkins Family Center, Inc.; One Pennsylvania – Education Rights Network; Our Revolution Ohio; Pa’lante Restorative Justice; Reclaim Our Schools LA; Rights & Democracy VT and NH; Silver State Equality – Nevada; Sisters of St. Dominic of Blauvelt, New York; Southern Maine Showing Up for Racial Justice; Special Education Equity for Kids (CT); SURJ Ohio; Tenants and Workers United; Uplift MN LLC.

“Students, especially youth with disabilities and Black and Brown youth, continue to be overpoliced in our nation’s schools. The federal government must stop funding this school-to-prison pipeline. We must divest from school policing and reinvest in counselors, social workers, and nurses who support our students and communities,” said West Resendes of the American Civil Liberties Union.

“For years we have seen troubling patterns in our public schools: students with disabilities, students of color, and other marginalized students are more harshly disciplined, referred to law enforcement, and arrested. It is time that schools truly become a safe place for every child to learn and grow. The Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act is a step toward helping every school can invest in what works: the use of evidence-based and trauma-informed services and increasing access to counselors, social workers and mental health professionals. Schools must have these building blocks to provide a safe and inclusive environment for all students,” said Meghan Whittaker, Director of Policy and Advocacy at the National Center for Learning Disabilities.

“I grew up in a predominantly Black and brown neighborhood where I have watched the impact that policing has had in our schools,” said Mariet Leana, youth leader at Make the Road New York and Urban Youth Collaborative. “I have witnessed young people lose their hope and feel that schools are no longer safe places for them because of an overwhelming number of police officers and so few counselors, therapists and other support services that students need to thrive. The Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act will invest desperately needed resources into the support that students need: counseling — not criminalization.”

“LGBTQ+ young people, especially those who are BIPOC and students with disabilities, are entering the school-to-prison pipeline at higher rates than their non-LGBTQ+ peers. Discriminatory policies and practices—especially the routine reliance on school-based law enforcement—is at the root of this inequity,” said GLSEN Interim Executive Director Melanie Willingham-Jaggers (she/they). “GLSEN is proud to endorse the Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act as a crucial step towards decriminalizing youth by investing instead in counseling and health services that foster positive, LGBTQ+ inclusive school climates and promote students’ wellbeing and academic success.”

“The cops in our schools are the same cops that control, terrorize, and criminalize Black, Brown and poor people on our streets,” said Katherine Dunn, Director of Advancement Project National Office’s Opportunity to Learn program. “It’s past time that we listen to young people who are demanding Police Free Schools and an end to the system that disproportionately harms and oppresses youth of color. Advancement Project National Office is proud to support this effort to shift federal resources away from school policing and towards the supportive, restorative resources that our kids need to learn, grow, and thrive.”

“The Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act invests in students’ mental health and wellbeing and divests from racist and harmful disciplinary actions which impact young peoples’ health and livelihoods. The bill is an important first step to bringing about needed change in school climate, as all young people deserve to feel safe and supported,” said Olivia Golden, Executive Director of the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP).

“The Counseling Not Criminalization in Schools Act will mean that our nation has begun to invest in what actually works to keep our kids safe and in school – counselors, social workers, restorative justice staff, and other behavioral support personnel – and will also mean the nation is stepping away from what doesn’t work: harmful and punitive police in schools. We look forward to helping the bill’s sponsors to ensure this important legislation advances to enactment,” said the National Center for Youth Law.

In March 2021, Rep. Pressley re-introduced her Ending PUSHOUT Act, her bold legislation to end the punitive pushout of girls of color from schools and disrupt the school-to-confinement pathway. The bill, which she initially introduced in December 2019, is also informed by Rep. Pressley’s People’s Justice Guarantee and is a continuation of her longstanding history of working to address issues of criminalization during her tenure on the Boston City Council.

https://www.facebook.com/populardemocracy/videos/267519715154905

 

Michigan Representative Proposes Bill That Limits THC In Drivers Bloodstream

Michigan Representative Proposes Bill That Limits THC In Drivers Bloodstream

Kalamazoo-MI- Rep. Pamela Hornberger of Macomb County has presented HB 4727, which would draw the lawful line of THC a driver can have in their framework to 5 nanograms for every milliliter of blood. Currently there is not limit what is considered being high or impaired to drive.

Rep. Hornberger is working with Macomb County Prosecutor Peter Lucido to introduce this bill. Read more on this story

National Juvenile Justice Network Release One Year Update: Shut Down Sequel Progress Report

National Juvenile Justice Network Release One Year Update: Shut Down Sequel Progress Report

Kalamazoo, MI- Today, NJJN released its Shut Down Sequel Progress Report, a one-year look at the campaign that calls for an end to Sequel Youth and Family Services and harmful use of youth restraints.

Please read, share and #SayHisName #CorneliusFrederick #ShutDownSequel #JusticeForCornelius http://bit.ly/shutdownsequelprogress

Organizers Emergent Justice, PACCT BOARD, local grassroots organization is working in partnership with Troubled Podcast and various organizations from across the county to virtually gather to celebrate the short life of Cornelius Fredrick. Register for the virtual memorial by clicking on link: Remembering Cornelius Fredrick One Year Later

Streaming Live @ https://www.youtube.com/c/majyckradio

Checkout more social justice videos>>NO JUSTICE! NO PEACE!

Kalamazoo County seeks residents to serve on Reparations Task Force

Kalamazoo County seeks residents to serve on Reparations Task Force

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, April 1, 2021
Contact: Dina Sutton, dpsutt@kalcounty.com

Kalamazoo County seeks residents to serve on Reparations Task Force
Task force will examine historical discriminatory practices throughout the community, recommend next steps

KALAMAZOO, Mich. — Kalamazoo County Board of Commissioners Vice Chair and head of the Kalamazoo County Reparations Task Force Tami Rey announced the county is accepting applications from residents to serve on the Reparations Task Force. The task force was created earlier this year following the adoption of a resolution brought forward by the Kalamazoo County Board.

“It is vital for the Reparations Task Force to have input from residents from all walks of life and professions that run the gamut, from the community organizers to doctors and attorneys, which is why I am encouraging residents to apply to be a member of the task force,” Rey said. “This task force will take a critical look at the historical practices of racial discrimination throughout the community and have frank and open conversations to determine how to remedy the discriminatory practices that have led to disparities in wealth, housing, employment, education and health.”

The task force is seeking residents from professional fields including, but not limited to:

  • Health care
  • Education
  • Community organizers or activists
  • Workforce development
  • Legal
  • BIPOC community organizations
  • Finance
  • LGBTQIA+

Elected officials and county leaders have also been invited to join the task force, including Administrator Tracie Moored, Treasurer Thomas Whitener and county commissioners.

“I applaud Vice Chair Rey for taking the initiative to create this task force and reach out to community members so we can start having the important conversation about reparations in Kalamazoo County,” Board Chair Tracy Hall said. “The goal of this task force aligns with our vision of ensuring Kalamazoo County is actively working toward racial equity and to become a welcoming place for everyone to live, work and raise a family.”

Once the task force completes its examination, it will be charged with recommending appropriate remedies to the county board

.Residents who want to apply can fill out this form or contact vice chair Rey at Tami.Rey@kalcounty.com.

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Kalamazoo County Identification Program Re-Opens

Kalamazoo County Identification Program Re-Opens

April 1, 2021
Contact:
Meredith Place Kalamazoo County Clerk & Register of Deeds
269-384-8141

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Kalamazoo County Identification Program re-opens
County ID program has been closed since March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic
KALAMAZOO, Mich. –Kalamazoo County Clerk & Register of Deeds, Meredith Place today
announced the immediate availability of the Kalamazoo County Identification Card. Kalamazoo
County residents can now schedule an appointment to obtain a new county ID, renew an
expired ID or replace a lost or stolen ID. This service was shut down in March 2020 by then
Kalamazoo County Clerk Tim Snow due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
“From the moment I took office, I made re-launching this service a priority, which is why I am
overjoyed to finally be able to re-open this popular program,” Place said. “Kalamazoo County
residents need identification now more than ever, whether it’s to receive a COVID-19 vaccine,
access affordable housing or open a bank account. I’m proud of the work our staff and members
of the Kalamazoo County Identification Program Advisory Board have done to ensure this
program is open to the public.”
Proposed by former County Commissioner Larry Provancher in 2016, the County ID Program
officially opened to the public in May 2018. The Kalamazoo County ID is intended to recognize
all Kalamazoo County residents and ensure they can connect with public safety, civic and
community services. The county ID cards feature a card holder’s photograph, date of birth,
address, signature, a unique ID number and other descriptors, such as height, weight and
eye color. ID cards are good for three years.
Nearly 3,000 residents saw the value of the Kalamazoo County ID prior to the service
shutting down due to Covid-19. Over the last year, the Kalamazoo County Clerk and Register
of Deeds’ office received countless phone calls and emails asking when the ID cards would
be reissued.
“We live in a society that often takes personal identification for granted, yet we’re required to
have it on-hand and display it when asked,” said Francisco J. Villegas, chair of the Kalamazoo
County Identification Program Advisory Board. “Barriers continue to exist in ensuring access to
a Michigan ID. And, in the time of a global pandemic, the inability to produce an ID carries
greater consequences.”
In order to obtain a County ID, Kalamazoo County residents are required to prove their
residency status and identify themselves with several documents. Various types of identification
documents are valued on a point scale, and residents must provide 300-400 points worth of
identification to qualify.
“I want to thank Kalamazoo County Clerk and Register of Deeds Meredith Place and her team
for reinstating this popular program,” said Kalamazoo County Housing Director and former
Treasurer Mary Balkema. “Identification is key to receiving many of our services and our
houseless community members need the county ID to get back on their feet.”
The Kalamazoo County ID Program is open Monday through Friday by appointment in the Clerk
& Register of Deeds office of the Kalamazoo County Administration Building. For more
information or to schedule an appointment, please see visit our website,
www.kalcounty.com/clerk/id or contact the ID Office at (269) 384-8307.
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KALAMAZOO ORGANIZERS HOLD VIGIL FOR GEORGE FLOYD

KALAMAZOO ORGANIZERS HOLD VIGIL FOR GEORGE FLOYD

Kalamazoo, MI- Last night, youth and community organizers gathered to show solidarity and to continue to memorialize the short lived life of George Floyd who was killed by police last summer. Organized by Corianna McDowell and Quintin Bryant according to the Facebook post.

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, while being arrested for allegedly using a counterfeit bill. Derek Chauvin, a white police officer with the Minneapolis Police Department, knelt on Floyd’s neck for approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds after he was handcuffed and lying face down in the street.

Floyd complained about being unable to breathe prior to being on the ground, but after being restrained he became more distressed, and continued to complain about breathing difficulties. Officer Chauvin placed his neck on the neck of Floyd until medics told him to.

Today is the first day trial began for the officer, Derek Chauvin, accused of who killed George Floyd. “I feel that we can not allow our voices to be silent”. Organizers met at 8:00pm with signs, and solidarity to show our community & the world we stand together. In addition to the program, there was a moment of silence for 8:46 that same length of time that George laid on the ground pleading for his life as the officer left his knees pressed against his neck until he passed away.

LIVE COVERAGE OF Derek Chauvin case https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=744978849344129&ref=search

Check out Kalamazoo organizers and youth stand in solidarity for JUSTICE!  https://youtu.be/a-38ALEc5_I

Jackie’s Urban Farm and Micro Grocery

Kalamazoo, MI-  Jackie Mitchell, resident of Kalamazoo and entrepreneur, is in the process of developing a corner of the Southside neighborhood into a hub for health through community gardening and connection. The space will have an indoor garden facility and feature education about sustainable gardening practices and food from local growers.

Jackie has been involved in multiple local efforts to address racial inequities on health, wealth and education in Kalamazoo. She has used her own money and know how and shared her knowledge and opportunities with family and community members. Jackie also has plans to provide space for local artists and makers to sell their crafts in this space.

Mitchell has completed a course in urban gardening through KVCC as well as multiple courses and consultation on small business development. She has developed a thorough business plan and has secured a business loan and multiple  small grants to rehab the building and purchase necessary equipment. Extensive electrical, plumbing and construction work is still needed to get this business up and running.

Mitchell recently presented her project to Urban Democracy FEAST on March 20 and was awarded 100% of the FEAST crowd-fund which included, presenter for Fuel After the Economy, Alex Sanchez, graciously donated their awarded funds from the events presentations. To find out more about Urban Democracy FEAST and the next opportunities to present your social justice projects, visit www.urbandemocracyfeast.org

Please donate something to get this business going.

Huey D’s Goodies Scholarship Opportunity

Kalamazoo, MI- Huey D’s Goodies, is proud to announce the launch of their Big Brother Scholarship. This scholarship is aimed to support prospect black male graduates of Kalamazoo Public School who wish to attend college or trade school.

We want the next generation to follow their dreams and reach their fullest potential. It takes a village, which is the perfect reason several black owned businesses will come together to make this possible.

This is no ordinary scholarship! Let’s celebrate academic excellence with a graduation photoshoot/video blurb from LPSL, gourmet cheesecake from Huey D’s Goodies, T-shirt from Custom Dope Apparel, hair cut from the amazing barber Anthony Ross & funding for school of choice.

This scholarship requires an essay of 300 words at minimum explaining why you should be selected. Please send written essay along with your contact information (first & last name, email & school) to HueydsgoodiesSFA@yahoo.com

The deadline is March 1st-May 1st, 2021

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