National Juvenile Justice Network Release One Year Update: Shut Down Sequel Progress Report

National Juvenile Justice Network Release One Year Update: Shut Down Sequel Progress Report

Kalamazoo, MI- Today, NJJN released its Shut Down Sequel Progress Report, a one-year look at the campaign that calls for an end to Sequel Youth and Family Services and harmful use of youth restraints.

Please read, share and #SayHisName #CorneliusFrederick #ShutDownSequel #JusticeForCornelius http://bit.ly/shutdownsequelprogress

Organizers Emergent Justice, PACCT BOARD, local grassroots organization is working in partnership with Troubled Podcast and various organizations from across the county to virtually gather to celebrate the short life of Cornelius Fredrick. Register for the virtual memorial by clicking on link: Remembering Cornelius Fredrick One Year Later

Streaming Live @ https://www.youtube.com/c/majyckradio

Checkout more social justice videos>>NO JUSTICE! NO PEACE!

Kalamazoo County seeks residents to serve on Reparations Task Force

Kalamazoo County seeks residents to serve on Reparations Task Force

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, April 1, 2021
Contact: Dina Sutton, dpsutt@kalcounty.com

Kalamazoo County seeks residents to serve on Reparations Task Force
Task force will examine historical discriminatory practices throughout the community, recommend next steps

KALAMAZOO, Mich. — Kalamazoo County Board of Commissioners Vice Chair and head of the Kalamazoo County Reparations Task Force Tami Rey announced the county is accepting applications from residents to serve on the Reparations Task Force. The task force was created earlier this year following the adoption of a resolution brought forward by the Kalamazoo County Board.

“It is vital for the Reparations Task Force to have input from residents from all walks of life and professions that run the gamut, from the community organizers to doctors and attorneys, which is why I am encouraging residents to apply to be a member of the task force,” Rey said. “This task force will take a critical look at the historical practices of racial discrimination throughout the community and have frank and open conversations to determine how to remedy the discriminatory practices that have led to disparities in wealth, housing, employment, education and health.”

The task force is seeking residents from professional fields including, but not limited to:

  • Health care
  • Education
  • Community organizers or activists
  • Workforce development
  • Legal
  • BIPOC community organizations
  • Finance
  • LGBTQIA+

Elected officials and county leaders have also been invited to join the task force, including Administrator Tracie Moored, Treasurer Thomas Whitener and county commissioners.

“I applaud Vice Chair Rey for taking the initiative to create this task force and reach out to community members so we can start having the important conversation about reparations in Kalamazoo County,” Board Chair Tracy Hall said. “The goal of this task force aligns with our vision of ensuring Kalamazoo County is actively working toward racial equity and to become a welcoming place for everyone to live, work and raise a family.”

Once the task force completes its examination, it will be charged with recommending appropriate remedies to the county board

.Residents who want to apply can fill out this form or contact vice chair Rey at Tami.Rey@kalcounty.com.

###

Kalamazoo County Identification Program Re-Opens

Kalamazoo County Identification Program Re-Opens

April 1, 2021
Contact:
Meredith Place Kalamazoo County Clerk & Register of Deeds
269-384-8141

.

Kalamazoo County Identification Program re-opens
County ID program has been closed since March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic
KALAMAZOO, Mich. –Kalamazoo County Clerk & Register of Deeds, Meredith Place today
announced the immediate availability of the Kalamazoo County Identification Card. Kalamazoo
County residents can now schedule an appointment to obtain a new county ID, renew an
expired ID or replace a lost or stolen ID. This service was shut down in March 2020 by then
Kalamazoo County Clerk Tim Snow due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
“From the moment I took office, I made re-launching this service a priority, which is why I am
overjoyed to finally be able to re-open this popular program,” Place said. “Kalamazoo County
residents need identification now more than ever, whether it’s to receive a COVID-19 vaccine,
access affordable housing or open a bank account. I’m proud of the work our staff and members
of the Kalamazoo County Identification Program Advisory Board have done to ensure this
program is open to the public.”
Proposed by former County Commissioner Larry Provancher in 2016, the County ID Program
officially opened to the public in May 2018. The Kalamazoo County ID is intended to recognize
all Kalamazoo County residents and ensure they can connect with public safety, civic and
community services. The county ID cards feature a card holder’s photograph, date of birth,
address, signature, a unique ID number and other descriptors, such as height, weight and
eye color. ID cards are good for three years.
Nearly 3,000 residents saw the value of the Kalamazoo County ID prior to the service
shutting down due to Covid-19. Over the last year, the Kalamazoo County Clerk and Register
of Deeds’ office received countless phone calls and emails asking when the ID cards would
be reissued.
“We live in a society that often takes personal identification for granted, yet we’re required to
have it on-hand and display it when asked,” said Francisco J. Villegas, chair of the Kalamazoo
County Identification Program Advisory Board. “Barriers continue to exist in ensuring access to
a Michigan ID. And, in the time of a global pandemic, the inability to produce an ID carries
greater consequences.”
In order to obtain a County ID, Kalamazoo County residents are required to prove their
residency status and identify themselves with several documents. Various types of identification
documents are valued on a point scale, and residents must provide 300-400 points worth of
identification to qualify.
“I want to thank Kalamazoo County Clerk and Register of Deeds Meredith Place and her team
for reinstating this popular program,” said Kalamazoo County Housing Director and former
Treasurer Mary Balkema. “Identification is key to receiving many of our services and our
houseless community members need the county ID to get back on their feet.”
The Kalamazoo County ID Program is open Monday through Friday by appointment in the Clerk
& Register of Deeds office of the Kalamazoo County Administration Building. For more
information or to schedule an appointment, please see visit our website,
www.kalcounty.com/clerk/id or contact the ID Office at (269) 384-8307.
                                                      ###
KALAMAZOO ORGANIZERS HOLD VIGIL FOR GEORGE FLOYD

KALAMAZOO ORGANIZERS HOLD VIGIL FOR GEORGE FLOYD

Kalamazoo, MI- Last night, youth and community organizers gathered to show solidarity and to continue to memorialize the short lived life of George Floyd who was killed by police last summer. Organized by Corianna McDowell and Quintin Bryant according to the Facebook post.

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, while being arrested for allegedly using a counterfeit bill. Derek Chauvin, a white police officer with the Minneapolis Police Department, knelt on Floyd’s neck for approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds after he was handcuffed and lying face down in the street.

Floyd complained about being unable to breathe prior to being on the ground, but after being restrained he became more distressed, and continued to complain about breathing difficulties. Officer Chauvin placed his neck on the neck of Floyd until medics told him to.

Today is the first day trial began for the officer, Derek Chauvin, accused of who killed George Floyd. “I feel that we can not allow our voices to be silent”. Organizers met at 8:00pm with signs, and solidarity to show our community & the world we stand together. In addition to the program, there was a moment of silence for 8:46 that same length of time that George laid on the ground pleading for his life as the officer left his knees pressed against his neck until he passed away.

LIVE COVERAGE OF Derek Chauvin case https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=744978849344129&ref=search

Check out Kalamazoo organizers and youth stand in solidarity for JUSTICE!  https://youtu.be/a-38ALEc5_I

Jackie’s Urban Farm and Micro Grocery

Kalamazoo, MI-  Jackie Mitchell, resident of Kalamazoo and entrepreneur, is in the process of developing a corner of the Southside neighborhood into a hub for health through community gardening and connection. The space will have an indoor garden facility and feature education about sustainable gardening practices and food from local growers.

Jackie has been involved in multiple local efforts to address racial inequities on health, wealth and education in Kalamazoo. She has used her own money and know how and shared her knowledge and opportunities with family and community members. Jackie also has plans to provide space for local artists and makers to sell their crafts in this space.

Mitchell has completed a course in urban gardening through KVCC as well as multiple courses and consultation on small business development. She has developed a thorough business plan and has secured a business loan and multiple  small grants to rehab the building and purchase necessary equipment. Extensive electrical, plumbing and construction work is still needed to get this business up and running.

Mitchell recently presented her project to Urban Democracy FEAST on March 20 and was awarded 100% of the FEAST crowd-fund which included, presenter for Fuel After the Economy, Alex Sanchez, graciously donated their awarded funds from the events presentations. To find out more about Urban Democracy FEAST and the next opportunities to present your social justice projects, visit www.urbandemocracyfeast.org

Please donate something to get this business going.

Who are Police in Detroit Targeting in the Gun Grab, and How?

Who are Police in Detroit Targeting in the Gun Grab, and How?

Making a virtual appearance in Wayne County’s 36th District Court bright and early on Friday, the man on the screen in a dapper grey suit and striped tie, salt and pepper hair and a gentle demeanor, hardly cast the figure of a gun-toting outlaw. Sitting upright and attentive from his homey living room, Otis Goree took his turn in front of Judge Kenneth King for a preliminary hearing stemming from his February arrest for carrying a concealed weapon without a permit.

Otis’ case was one many like it being heard that morning in courtroom 438. Though access to the public was limited (several were abandoned in the Zoom waiting room after attempting to log on using the public link), our from Majyck Radio was able to watch over an hour of the proceedings, during which dozens of individuals came before the court for concealed carry charges. 

Since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, gun sales across the country have been on the rise, and gun violence has risen alarmingly in many major metropolitan areas.  In response, Detroit police are cracking down – focusing their efforts on identifying, stopping and questioning individuals they believe to be carrying weapons and making arrests when those individuals are unable to furnish a concealed carry permit –  which, unlike the guns themselves, have become difficult to obtain. Getting a license requires a gun owner to successfully complete an approved training course – in person. While the pandemic rages on, many providers of the training have limited or entirely suspended their offerings due to public health concerns and social distancing requirements.  Amidst an uptick in violence within their neighborhoods, citizens like Otis feel at risk, but unable to legally protect themselves.

Otis Goree, Grandfather of 2Otis, 59, is a lifelong resident of Detroit. A hardworking family man and grandfather of 2, he enjoys working with his hands.  Since heart attacks in 2018 forced him into early retirement from his job in building maintenance, Otis spends most of his time gardening, woodworking, and relaxing at home.

Prior to 2020, Otis had never owned or fired a gun in his life, and didn’t feel like his lifestyle necessitated a firearm. That changed with the onset of Covid-19 in early 2020, and the massive social unrest, racially motivated and politically sanctioned violence, and an increasing sense of fear and desperation among many of his neighbors that led to increased violent crime in his community. Otis no longer felt safe, and for the first time looked to equipping himself with a firearm for personal protection. 

Otis is not alone. It is estimated that first time gun owners account for over 40% of gun sales in the country since early 2020 – more than double the average in previous years.

Otis purchased his small pistol from an authorized dealer and made sure to have it registered immediately. He didn’t know when he made his purchase that he would not be able to take a class locally to obtain his Concealed Carry Permit – information the seller didn’t share with him until after Otis had purchased and registered the weapon.  So, while the gun would afford him some peace of mind at home, it would have to stay there. And it did, until one snowy day in February. 

Normally, Otis relies on friends and family to drive him when he has errands to run. On February 17th, however, there was no one available to take him. Instead, he would have to walk to the stop on 7 Mile and take the bus. “I needed my vegetables”, Otis says, so he set out with his reusable grocery bags, his walking cane and, for the first time, his pistol. “Things had gotten pretty bad,” he explained, referring to violence in his neighborhood off 7 mile in Detroit.  Indeed, homicides in Detroit rose 19% in 2020, and non-fatal shootings were up 53%. So when he left on what would have otherwise been a routine trip to the market, he tucked the gun securely into the waistband of his pants, underneath his heavy winter coat. Otis explains that he didn’t make the decision lightly, but that he felt the need to bring a weapon with him because he feared for his safety in the neighborhood and at the bus stops. 

The shopping itself was uneventful, but while he waited, loaded down with bags of groceries, at the stop for the bus that would take him back home, suddenly two officers pulled up in a black stealth police SUV, got out, approached him (and only him) directly and immediately asked him if he had a weapon. Otis replied honestly that he did, and when asked if he had a CCW permit, told the officers he did not. Otis was relieved when after a few minutes, the officers then told him to go ahead and get on his bus and go home.  Unfortunately by the time he gathered his bags from the sidewalk, the bus had already moved on. Not wanting to stick around, he decided to walk to the next stop and catch his ride from there. He made it less than a block down the road before another stealth police vehicle pulled aside him and two more officers questioned him – exactly as they had at the bus stop moments before. Otis replied as he had at the bus stop, and once again the officers told him to be on his way and pulled off.  

Increasingly nervous and just wanting to get home, Otis walked on for another half a block or so before a third police vehicle pulled in front of him at the next intersection and blocked his path. He was bewildered. The exchange started out much the same – Otis shared when asked that he had a weapon, told them where it was, and explained he did not have a permit. This time, he was arrested. 

Sitting in the back of the police car that day, Otis recalls that his arresting officers claimed to not know about his having been stopped previously, which surprised him. Surely it was more than coincidence that led to his being stopped by three separate police vehicles on such a short journey. And how did they all seem to know he had a gun? Were the police using some kind of detector tools on patrol? He asked his arresting officers, who laughed. “We’re just really good at our jobs” one said. The coy denial didn’t convince Otis.  What would have otherwise prompted them to approach a greying older gentleman with a cane and bags of groceries at a bus stop? If they didn’t already know he had a gun, why was that the first question they asked at each stop?  

Others agree with Otis’ suspicions – and the idea isn’t far fetched. For years, the department of defense and policing agencies in the united states have been developing and piloting technologies that can detect weapons from as many as 80 feet away, raising fourth amendment concerns about whether or not scanning a person’s body of personal effects absent a warrant constitutes an illegal search. Though public information on the use of these technologies in Detroit is difficult to find, we know they have been implemented elsewhere in recent years, including in New York, where after public outcry the city voted to require the police department to publicly disclose their use of surveillance technology – something they had been actively trying to keep quiet. Meanwhile, the Detroit Police Department has increased its surveillance on citizens in recent years, with the installation of cameras on city streets and audio gunshot detector software that uses cell phone audio to pick up gunfire and triangulate its location. And given the department’s partnership with federal agencies over the summer with Operation Legend – and the millions of dollars that came attached – it’s easy to imagine they may have gained access to even more tools like these. 

Farooq Azizuddin says that even if Detroit Police haven’t acquired new technology, for over fifteen years they have employed a scanning device that can be aimed at individuals from a distance to pick up “unusual amounts’ ‘ of metals on a person. Azizuddin, a security expert and former Black Panther, says these devices were developed during the Iraq war to keep troops safe from armed insurgents overseas and eventually, as commonly happens with military tools, they became available to law enforcement agencies stateside. 

When Otis was booked at the county jail after his arrest in February, he shared a cell with several others, at least 11, who were also awaiting arraignment on weapons possession charges. All had similar stories about their arrests. Over the course of his 3 day stay, the trend continued; those that bonded out were quickly replaced with others newly arrested under similar circumstances. The numbers aren’t surprising; DPD’s Chief James Craig calls his department’s efforts to crack down on guns “aggressive”. 

There is no question that gun violence is a huge problem in our communities, one that has grown considerably in the last year. But rather than address the root causes of crime and violence in a community historically marginalized and poverty stricken, currently experiencing the worst effects of the current pandemic, the city is focusing instead on increasing surveillance of its citizens and casting a wide net to grab as many guns as they can. But who is getting caught up in it? Chief Craig has been a longtime advocate for an armed citizenry, stating his belief that “good guys”, law abiding citizens with guns create safer communities, reduce crime, and even deter terrorism. Thanks to the pandemic’s limiting effect on the registration and licensing process for firearms in addition to an increased need for personal safety, people like Otis, who has no prior criminal history, are finding themselves targeted – seemingly by virtue of being Black. The stealth units appearing in Black neighborhoods conducting these sweeps seem to be absent from more affluent white areas of the city. Maybe that’s where Craig believes the “good guys” are?

Now Otis, who has been looking forward to finally being able to spend time with his children and grandchildren once the threat of Covid-19 subsides, is instead staring directly at a felony charge of carrying a concealed weapon without a permit – punishable by up to five years in prison.  The process is slow, but Otis has a lot of questions about his case, and he intends to use this time to get answers. His preliminary hearing today was adjourned until June 30th on account of his attorney having only this morning received the discovery packet – containing documents and evidence necessary to develop his defense.  In addition to working with a public defender, Otis has also partnered with Emergent Justice’s Participatory Defense Hub – a cooperative of individuals who come together regularly to review cases, strategize, and dismantle roadblocks to achieving just outcomes. The team will be working diligently in the coming months to support him and his attorney on this case in the coming months. 

In the meantime, while the specter of “justice” hangs over his head, Otis plans to go about his business more or less as usual.  He’ll ready his gardens for spring, do a little woodworking, practice the harmonica, and maybe even get around to restoring the old Corvette in his garage. And while his own fate is uncertain, he wants more than anything for the community to be aware of the tools and tactics of the police that patrol his city. “Everybody is safer when everybody else knows what’s going on”. 

Majyck Radio reached out to the Detroit Police Department to inquire about their use of surveillance technology, and hopes to learn more about the circumstances that led to Mr. Goree’s arrest. We will continue to follow his case. More information about Participatory Defense can be found online at Emergent Justice’s Website: emergentjustice.org.

Standing Or Walking While Black In Detroit

Detroit, Michigan- Elisheva Johnson serves as the Executive Director of EMERGENT JUSTICE, an organization dedicated to ending mass incarceration in our community country, Emergent Justiceand eventually world.

The foundation of the work this organization serves to fulfill is participatory defense. We essentially become an effective part of the defense team for a person moving through the system, supporting their defense attorneys as researchers, story tellers and sometimes investigators supporting families and loved ones of those in trouble with the Criminal legal system.

Since there is no such thing as, “My loved one went to jail school”, we help people to navigate the challenges of the injustice system, and to show community support for someone returning home. We do this as a community of returning citizens and directly impacted people. We take and transform these stories into campaigns for policy reforms, and campaigns to replace bad actors in the system like prosecutors, judges, police chiefs, and others. We know that supporting families in writing biographical materials to help humanize clients and tell their stories, can be impactful in changing the trajectory of a case, in fact we have won cases in this very fashion!

“In Michigan, it is legal for a person to carry a firearm in public as long as the person is carrying the firearm with lawful intent and the firearm is not concealed. … It is legal because there is no Michigan law that prohibits it; however, Michigan law limits the premises on which a person may carry a firearm.”

To Otis this all seems to be very unfair on top of the fact that this is all happening during a Pandemic.

“Right now we need help for Otis Goree!” :

MJR: Can you give us a briefing on what is currently going on with Mr. Goree?

EJ: “Sure, no problem”.The story is: Otis was sad that he had recently lost his dog, Martin. Martin was a Japanese Akita, that Otis loved and cared for for a long time. He had just left the vet and was preparing to bury his beloved pet, when he tried to dig a hole the ground was frozen, he broken down from frustration in a furry of tears, Otis was completely heart broken. He couldn’t bear thinking about having to bury his dog sitting in the box in his living room, so he decided he would take a break and walk to a local store. On his way back, his mind started to clear, he felt a little better, as he stood at the bus stop on 7 mile and Outer Drive. Then out of nowhere, the police pulled up and asked Otis what kind of gun he had. Otis was stunned, and scared that the police stopped and wanted to search him. There was no cause to search or ask him anything, but Otis fully cooperated with the police. Otis worried he was going to jail and mentioned that he has pre-existing conditions that made it unsafe to locked up right now. He is a triple by-pass survivor and still has heart conditions that he takes medicine for today. He missed out on medication for over two days while he was being detained in a Detroit Detention center on Mound Road, where he was held in a cell with about ten other inmates that where not social distanced. How could this happen when Otis doesn’t even have a felony record. (The usual argument used by police.)

MJR: “Thank you for sharing his story. Social media has helped show the world that many instances when a BIPOC person is dealing with police have been non-violent”.

ET: “Most definitely!” Social media has helped with sharing of traumas and similarly shared interactions with police and black men that are minor or over embellished bringing harm or even death”. Over the past year, we have heard of the rising COVID-19 cases in MI jails and prisons. Again, looking at the circumstances of Mr. Goree’s arrest, we know, WE are targeted even more as Black people”.

EJ:So there’s been a scramble in states to release non-violent detainees. Nina Ginsberg, president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers says it’s a critical step that needs to occur. “This is ground zero,” she says. “Once coronavirus gets into a jail, there’s no way to stop it from spreading. You cannot do social distancing in a jail. You cannot.”

MJR: For the folks that are reading this or will hear about Mr. Goree, what can they do to support him and the work of Emergent Justice?

EJ: Thank you for asking!  First, folks can call  Representative Rashida Tlaib and tell her that gun profiling has to stop! At Emergent Justice, our work is led by directly impacted folks. We are always recruiting and open to like minded individuals that want to transform the criminal justice and end mass incarceration”

Contact Elisheva Johnson: elisheva@emjustice.org

Rep. Rashida Tlaib Offices:

1628 Longworth HOB
WashingtonDC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5126

7700 2nd Ave.

DetroitMI 48202
(313) 463-6220

4401 Conner St.

DetroitMI 48215
(313) 463-6220
26215 Trowbridge St.

InksterMI 48141

(313) 463-6220
10600 W. Jefferson
River RougeMI 48218

Inside River Rouge City Hall 2nd Floor, RM. 207

https://www.npr.org/2020/03/25/820724581/balancing-justice-public-safety-virus-brings-changes-to-courts-jails-arrests

DEMOCRACY NEEDS YOU!

DEMOCRACY NEEDS YOU!

Kalamazoo, MI- UDF Organizers openly welcomes the community to attend the next spring virtual FEAST. Individuals and organizations that would like to present for the next FEAST, download the application and submit completed application to the People’s Food Co-Op by February 22, 2021. The People’s Food CO-OP is located at 507 Harrison Street, Kalamazoo, MI 49007.
Purchase tickets for the FEAST
For more information, visit: www.urbandemocracyfeast.org
Kalamazoo & SW Michigan BIPOC Communities Safety Suggestions For the 2021 Presidential Inauguration

Kalamazoo & SW Michigan BIPOC Communities Safety Suggestions For the 2021 Presidential Inauguration

Kalamazoo, MI- A message from organizers that are asking for members of BIPOC communities to taken in consideration as you plan your daily activities leading up the 2021 Presidential Inauguration.

BIPOC/ALLY Community Safety Suggestions for Jan. 17-20, 2021

Greeting you with Power.

These times are jarring and for many of us, unprecedented in BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) communities. The multiple emotions we will feel leading up to the inauguration and beyond are valid and normal. We make space to hold these feelings in radical love and commitment to our wellness

During the dates of January 17-20th, we are aware that many white supremacist groups plan to protest the state capitols of all of our US states. This is known through online information shared and the advice from secure sources.

Our advice to our BIPOC/Ally communities is to stay close to community and away from any actions taking place anywhere near where the white supremacist groups will be. “Stay Safe, Stay Home” takes on an even deeper meaning for these days.

During these days, we strongly advise BIPOC to:

  1. Take this weekend off of work.
    1. We implore employers to refrain from penalizing employees of color for taking off to ensure their safety is not compromised going to and from their homes. 
  2. Take this week to stock your home with enough food, water, and needed medications for up to 2 weeks in the event that going out safely will be harder to do because of actions we cannot predict leading up to the inauguration.
    1. Allies can be charged to help transport these items to vulnerable folks
  3. Check on your loved ones, bring the Elders up to speed, and offer comfort and assurance. Now is the time to practice radical care for one another.
  4.  Keep all devices charged and limit use when unplugged to conserve battery
  5. Secure a battery-powered radio in case of cell phone disruption to use to hear emergency radio broadcasts
  6. Write down important phone numbers in the event of phone service disruption
  7. Identify the closest landline to you and a safe route to use for emergencies. Do not travel alone.
  8. In case of fire, have an extinguisher and smoke detector batteries on hand.
  9. Stock up on blankets and warming packs in the event of power failure. Fiberglass blankets, flashlights or lanterns, are suggested
  10. Identify the safest place in your home, away from windows and visible lights, even a closet if needed to conceal yourself.

If leaving home is not avoidable, avoid traveling anywhere far from your home and going out by yourself.

Respect and Power,

 

M.O.H Host Voter Registration Event

Stephanie Moore at(269) 547-9002 Stephny4@gmail.com

Meshelle Foreman Shields at (410) 967-2078 meshelle@meshelle.net

Lon Walls at (301) 996-1669 lwalls@wallscomm.com

TO ENCOURAGE BLACK VOTER REGISTRATION AND ENGAGEMENT, THE MOTHERS OF HOPE AND THE BLACK WOMEN’S ROUNDTABLE OF KALAMAZOO ARE HOLDING
A ‘BLACK VOTERS MATTER’ BUS TOUR, SEPTEMBER 20-26

#RUVoteReady Events Are Designed to Increase Black Voter Education and Registration

Kalamazoo, MI (September 22, 2020) — Tuesday, September 22nd is being recognized as “National Voter Registration Day,” a nonpartisan civic holiday celebrating American democracy. The holiday has been endorsed by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS), the National Association of State Election Directors (NASED, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC), and the National Association of Election Officials (The Election Center). To educate and encourage African American voters in particular to register and vote, the Mothers of Hope (MOH) and the Black Women’s Roundtable (BWR) of Kalamazoo have scheduled and undertaken a weeklong series of activities entitled the “Black Voters Matter” bus tour.

On Sunday, September 20th, the group held an “Our Faith, Our Voice” event at Arcadia Park. On Monday, September 21st, there was a “Neighborhood Empowerment & Good Vibes” parking lot gathering event with DJ Chuck at W. North and Rose Streets. The purpose of these events was to register voters, verify voter registrations, request absentee ballots and provide voter empowerment information to ensure that every vote cast is counted.

Upcoming activities include:

  • Tuesday, September 22nd (National Voter Registration Day) (12:00 pm) – A Virtual discussion entitled “Respect
    Our Vote: Black Millennials & Generation Z Voters Matter”
  • Tuesday, September 22nd – Black Voters Matter Health Briefing and Pop Up Party (10:00 am-12:00 pm, Family
    Health Center, Alcott Street Parking Lot; 3:00-6:00 pm, Family Health Center, Paterson Street Parking Lot)
  • Wednesday, September 23rd – “Hustle & Vote” Noon-2:00 pm at the Arcadia Festival Site and 6:00 pm-8:00
    pm at the Vine Neighborhood Association
  • Thursday, September 24th – (4:30 pm-7:00 pm) Card Games, Good Vibes & Community Fellowship, Mothers of
    Hope, 603 Ada Street
  • Friday, September 25th (8:00 pm) – Bonfire & Fire Side Chat with Black Youth Vote at 414 W. Paterson St.
  • Saturday, September 26th (Noon-4:00 pm) – Mothers of Hope Recovery Celebration & Reunion at 603 Ada St.
    For more information, please go to
    www.mothers-of-hope.org.
    ###
    The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP) is one of the most active civil rights and social justice organizations in the nation “dedicated to
    increasing civic engagement, economic and voter empowerment in Black America.” The Black Women’s Roundtable (BWR) is the women and girls empowerment arm of the NCBCP. At the forefront of championing just and equitable public policy on behalf of Black women, BWR promotes their health and wellness, economic security & prosperity, education and global empowerment as key elements for success. Black Youth Vote is the youth-led civic leadership, training and organizing arm of the NCBCP.

      

@ncbcp @ncbcp National Coalition on Black Civic Participation

Pin It on Pinterest