Seeking Justice at Kalamazoo School Board Meeting

Seeking Justice at Kalamazoo School Board Meeting

Kalamazoo, MI- Kalamazoo Public Schools’ Board of Education meeting on November 29th, 2018 was a lengthy one, well attended by members of the community and education officials who came to speak on current issues impacting our district.

The meeting began with the recognition of  Northeastern Elementary’s “Turnaround Students”, followed by committee reports given by trustees highlighting their efforts in wellness, curriculum development, and marketing and policy.

Trustee Carol McGlinn relayed information on an initiative to provide “Diverse Classroom Libraries”, sets of books that reflect  the diversity of the student population, at each grade level. Second and third grade classrooms will benefit from these sets during the current school year, while kindergarteners and first graders should have them by the beginning of the next school year. The process of choosing books for fourth and fifth grade students is underway.

McGlinn also relayed that the evaluation committee is continuing to explore the use of Panorama Education Surveys in the district to evaluate the needs of the school community.

Trustee Ken Greschak shared information from a recent meeting of  the Operations Committee, including the efforts of the district’s communications team to “build awareness of the strengths of Kalamazoo Public Schools”. A billboard campaign is underway currently, as well as an increased use of social media and Excelsior to promote this narrative. Another part of the team’s plan involves creating videos for each school building which will feature students “talking about how and why they enjoy their particular school”. Though according to Mr. Greschak, budget constraints limit what they are able to accomplish currently, there has been talk of contracting with a marketing firm to assist these efforts. “We could look at hiring a marketing firm to help inform and advise us on better activities and we may yet do that.”

As reported by Trustee Craig Herschleb, KPS’ Policy Committee has been working on updates to graduation requirements, as well bringing the district in line with a State of Michigan mandate to include policy restricting school employees from making referrals or otherwise providing assistance to students seeking an abortion. The policy requires a district to impose a financial penalty to any individual found in violation of the restriction, and return an equal amount to to the State’s School Aid Fund.

An outline of purchase recommendations was provided by Assistant Superintendent Gary Start, including a $75,000 expenditure for Lexia Learning, literacy programming offered by the Rosetta Stone Company. This purchase will be paid out of a State Early Literacy grant and Title I funds. Updates to schools’ technology resources made possible with the 2018 bond include a plan to purchase over 3,000 Chromebooks for secondary ELA and Social Studies classrooms. 2018 and 2013 Bond funds will also pay for building remodeling at El Sol and South Westnedge (Phoenix) Schools, in addition to four new computer labs at Loy Norrix.

A higher than usual number of individuals took advantage of the opportunity to address the board during Thursday’s meeting, including Rebecca Leighton, teacher at Loy Norrix High School, who has facilitated the work of a group of students to develop a Women’s Studies Course, which has been submitted to the Curriculum Department for review.  Two of the curriculum’s designers, Emma Hilgart Griff and Isaac Moss, spoke on the need for the course as a way to provide a full and accurate depiction of womens’ historic struggles and contributions to society, including those of women of color, stating that current curriculum focuses almost entirely on “white men”. Mr. Moss stated that while he and Ms. Hilgart Grif are at opposite ends of the political spectrum (referring to himself as “fairly conservative and pro-gun”), it is his passion for history that inspired him to take on the project. Fellow student Hannah Sherman also came forward to express her support. The team urges the district to consider adding the Women’s Studies to a list of Social Studies course options. Students must currently fulfill four social studies course requirements in order to graduate.

Amiri Skyes, student at Milwood Middle School, came forward to speak on her awareness of the shortage of substitute teachers in the school. “I know teachers who didn’t have time for lunch because they have to sub in for a different class during their lunch break and planning time”. She also shared a letter written by Milwood teachers and staff on the subject, which said that, “The excessive shortage of substitute teachers in the district, and specifically at Milwood Middle School, is impacting the staff and students significantly.”, adding that the district’s emphasis on Professional development during instructional hours is using up too much of a limited resource.

When Amiri’s three minute limit had expired, her Mother, Shannon Sykes Nehring, picked up where she left off. “Fundamental to building relationships and trust is time.” reading the letter, which emphasized the need for building subs that are able to build trust and rapport with students, alleviating classroom behavior problems that often arise in presence of a substitute teacher. The letter also points out how the shortage of substitutes places a higher burden on teachers, increasing their workload and stress levels – major factors in teacher retention.  At Milwood, the letter contends, there is a need for two building substitutes. They currently employ only one, and the teachers wonder in their letter if the district is doing enough to recruit for the vacant position at the school.

Amanda Miller, President of the the Kalamazoo Education Association came forward with similar concerns, saying that a lack of substitute teachers has become “an emergency” and that the problem is worsened by PD trainings scheduled during class time. Miller also reported that many teachers and staff members have come to her with concerns about increased violence in the classroom and a “degrading culture and climate” that the schools have failed to adequately address. While she agrees with the districts efforts to reduce suspensions, she says that the way to accomplish this is with “consistent consequences, targeted interventions and increased supports”, rather than simply tolerating misbehavior or sending students home.

Miller also took time to express the KEA’s gratitude to outgoing Trustee Lauren Freedman for her service and advocacy.

The KEA’s Vice President, Loy Norrix Teacher Jen Aniano, also spoke on a challenging school culture. She says that she appreciates that the district came through and provided A.L.I.C.E (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, and Evacuate) training when teachers expressed their concern for school safety, but more must be done to support the vast number of children suffering the effects of trauma, and the impact of toxic stress on social and emotional learning and academic progress. “The time has come to stop talking about restorative justice and trauma informed schools and make these two concepts a reality. We will not truly be safe and create nurturing environments if we do not wholeheartedly adopt these programs consistently throughout the district.” Jen said, imploring the district to develop a plan that will be ready for implementation at the start of the next school year. “The time is now”.

Following Ms. Aniano’s remarks, a father of a Kindergartener at Northeastern Elementary came to the podium. Jeremy Anderson said his daughter was subjected to the use of occupational therapy and restraint tools without his consent during a crying episode earlier in the year. This was Mr. Anderson’s second address regarding the issue, having first brought the matter to the board during the November 8th meeting. He said that as a result of school employee’s actions his daughter has been diagnosed with PTSD and he is concerned that continued contact with staff members involved is not conducive to her ability to heal from the event, and his desire is to see the teacher and behavioral specialist transferred or terminated. According to Anderson, statements from those involved indicate that the tools used on his daughter were recommended and supplied by both the teacher and the behavior specialist, yet only the aid who used them has been removed from her position. He said that he has experienced difficulty obtaining information from the district, and suspects that the outcome might be different if it had been a white child at the center of the incident. “I can guarantee I will be at every board meeting speaking until my child and family gets the justice any family deserves”. The child’s mother and grandmother also came forward to question the districts handling of the case.

Following public comment, Cindy Green, Director of Teaching and Learning Services, brought forward for review several changes and additions to the middle and high school course offerings. Too numerous to list here, a complete description of these changes can be found within the November 28 meeting packet on the Kalamazoo Public Schools website. Notably absent, however, was mention of the proposed Women’s Studies class brought forward by speakers earlier in the meeting. After Ms. Green’s presentation, Trustee Lauren Freedman expressed that she would like more information about that course in particular before the board votes on the proposed offerings at the next meeting. Trustees Greshak, McGlinn, and board President Sholler-Barber echoed her remarks.

Finally, Superintendent Dr. Michael Rice delivered an annual State of the  Schools Presentation. Titled “KPS Rising!”. Supplying district data on enrollment, graduation, academic proficiency, the report outlined Board of Education’s goals, highlighted the gains that KPS has made in recent years, and compared increases in graduation rates and standardized test scores with comparable districts across Michigan. Notable achievements include:

  • An overall increase of KPS students taking Advanced Placement courses of 156% between the 2007/2008 school year and 2018/2019 school year, and during the same period an increase of 313% among African American/Multi-Ethnic students, 402% among those students who are economically disadvantaged, and a 1212% increase among those who identify as Hispanic.
  • According to the report, KPS graduation rates have risen overall each year for 6 years in a row.
  • District Enrollment has increased 25% since 2005, and graduation rates have risen 52%
  • A breakdown of graduation rate increases by race/ethnicity was not provided in the report.

The report also identified “Selected Challenges for the Year”, which included a need to promote Dignity and Respect for all students, “especially those who are poor, special needs, ELLs, LGBTQ or refugees”

The lengthy presentation also gave an overview of literacy programming, staff training initiatives and improvements to facilities.

Following the presentation, Trustee McGlinn congratulated Dr. Rice and the district for “moving the needle”, and working collaboratively to solve problems. President Sholler-Barber echoed these remarks.

Trustee Dr. Lauren Freedman spoke up to remind everyone in attendance that “we are not moving needles, we are moving children” and that though “a lot of what we do as a district is fabulous”, she is disheartened to learn about the kindergarten student from Northeastern, who’s family came to speak earlier in the evening.  “There is a child hurting, who doesn’t want to come to school” she said, urging district to do everything in their power to support she and her family, adding that she suspects that “there are more of those five year olds out there” and thinks that race is a factor. She implored the district to do more to own up to and address racism within the district, and “call it what it is”, suggesting participation in anti-racism training as well as create policy around restorative justice and becoming trauma informed.

A full recording of the November 29 meeting can be viewed on publicmedianet.org, and full minutes will be published on the Kalamazoo Public Schools website in advance of the next board meeting, scheduled for 7:00 pm on December 20th.

Writer Credits: Tandy Moore

3rd Kalamazoo School Board Candidate Forum at Vine Neighborhood Association

3rd Kalamazoo School Board Candidate Forum at Vine Neighborhood Association

Majyck Radio- All four candidates in the race for Board of Education appeared at a public forum Thursday to discuss challenges facing the school system.

The forum, third in a series of 4 held at the Vine Neighborhood Association, covered several issues under the board’s purview, but highlighted budgetary priorities, school safety and curricula.

Each candidate responding to each question with time allocated for the forum. Each candidate had one-minute to respond to each question with an optional rebuttal. The next forum is October 25, 2018 at Allen Chapel AME at 804 West North Street.

Opening statements from KPS Board Candidates:

Jermaine Jackson

 

People’s Lobby Day 2018 Attracts Local Youth to State Capital Building

People’s Lobby Day 2018 Attracts Local Youth to State Capital Building

Kalamazoo, MI- Hundreds of socially activated citizens from around the state descending to Lansing for, “The People’s Lobby, known in recent past as, “Capital Day”. 2018 makes the 7th year residents meet with their local legislators on issues ranging from Criminal Justice Reform, the Long Term Care Study Bill, Universal Family Care, Medicare for All, Water for Flint and Immigration.

S.E.E (Social. Economic. Educational) Change, group of families, students, educators, and community members working together to break the School to Prison Pipeline and dismantle
barriers to success through advocacy, education, empowerment, and action. S.E.E Change took a group of teen members from Kalamazoo’s area Girl Scouts and Kalammazoo Public Students and parents to meet with 60th House District Rep. Jon Hoadely and State Senator Margeret O’Brien.

Students were able to participate in a Direct Action Rally demanding a resolution for Flint residents and the water crisis that continues to this day.

S.E.E Change youth invited Representative Jon Hoadley to the 2nd Annual E.R.A.S.E Celebration on June 13, 2018 to celebrate all youth and the end of 2017/2018 academic school year at 1009 E. Stockbridge Street in Kalamazoo, MI.

Community Members Meet to Coordinate a Response to Recent Tragedies in Kalamazoo

Community Members Meet to Coordinate a Response to Recent Tragedies in Kalamazoo

Majyck Radio-Kalamazoo, MI-

Contributing writer-Tandy Moore

Majyck Radio Photo

Douglass Association Townhall Meeting Feb. 7. 2018

A town hall event Wednesday evening at the Douglass Community Center offered a chance for local residents discuss concerns about child safety in the wake of the tragic murder of a Grand Rapids teen, an attempted child abduction in Kalamazoo, and scandal relating to a violent incident at Kalamazoo Central. Co-hosted by Jermaine Jackson, the Circulation Director at the Alma Powell Branch of the Kalamazoo Public Library Antiracism Transformation Team member, and Jacob Pinney-Johnson of Kalamazoo’s 4Dad Fatherhood Initiative. The event was well attended by parents, caregivers, community leaders and other residents eager to discuss concrete ways to support and protect the city’s kids.

Mr. Jackson spoke of the recent abduction of a 4-year old girl in Kalamazoo was thwarted as a result of an adult intervention. Jermaine expressed his hope that the would-be tragedy will serve as a wake-up call for adults who too often feel that they should “mind their own business” when they have a feeling something isn’t right. He also stressed the need for parents to have frank conversations with their children about how to stay safe away from home, and about what to do if they find themselves in a dangerous situation.

Pinney-Johnson, Community Educator and advocate adding that the important role men and fathers play in safeguarding the lives of young people should not be overlooked.

4Dad’s Care Coordinator Derek Miller, alongside Mr. Pinney-Johnson work to support fathers in Kalamazoo by offering fellowship opportunities for men to share their experiences with fatherhood, free parenting workshops, and direct outreach to new or expecting dads.

Elisheva T. Johnson, Community Organizer with Michigan United’s S.E.E. Change, a campaign focused on educational advocacy and the School to Prison Pipeline, expressed her support for the teacher who was harmed in an attack by a student at Kalamazoo Central High School, as well as her deep concern for the minor child who was arrested the same day.

While he should be held accountable, Ms. Johnson said, his actions indicate a possible history of trauma and deep social and emotional struggles that will only be worsened by involvement in the criminal justice system. She urged the community to advocate for Restorative Justice measures in the prosecutor’s handling of the case, and called for the implementation of supportive, proactive policies at Kalamazoo’s schools, in line with Restorative Practices, to address the needs of vulnerable children and prevent future crises.

Many in attendance eagerly shared concerns and offered creative ideas for increased supervision and involvement in the development and safekeeping of neighborhood kids. Suggestions ranged from establishing specific homes as “safe houses” for children to go in case of an emergency to organizing “bus stop ministries”, whereby volunteers keep a watch over kids as they wait for their school bus.

Local organizer Ed Genesis announced a plan of action, modeled after the Black Panther’s Block Patrols of the 1960’s. The collaboration between S.E.E. Change and WE ACTIVE, a campaign focused on decarceration and criminal justice reform, is designed as block-by-block, a street-level initiative involving committed volunteers who will work in shifts around the clock to actively patrol and safeguard their streets.

Anyone wishing to get involved should contact the organizers via email: ed@miunited.org or elisheva@miunited.org.

While Wednesday’s agenda revolved around safety and neighborhood collaboration, an unexpected announcement of Jermaine Jackson’s candidacy for a seat on the Kalamazoo Public School Board drew enthusiastic applause. Mr. Jackson’s long record of youth and community involvement, as well as his enthusiasm for literature and education, will likely make him a popular choice for voters in November.

Discussions WIth 4Dad is held every Wednesday from 6:00 to 7:30 at the Douglass Community Center, and is open to men and fathers of all ages and experiences. For more information on other events and services offered by Kalamazoo County’s 4Dad Fatherhood Initiative, Mr. Johnson can be reached via email at dsmill@kalcounty.com.

Upcoming events at the Douglass Community Center can be found online at dcakalamazoo.com

Local Org Hosts Film & Discussion on Criminal Justice Reform

Local Org Hosts Film & Discussion on Criminal Justice Reform

 

Kalamazoo, MI, Majyck Radio-

On Wednesday evening, S.E.E. Change, local advocates for Social, Economic and Educational Change in Kalamazoo, partnered with the Arcus Center for Social Justice to present a documentary film exploring our criminal justice system’s current response to, and perpetuation of, personal and intergenerational trauma, racism, and poverty in our society.

Produced and directed by Dr. Shakti Butler, Healing Justice relies on interviews with ex-offenders, victims, artists, criminal justice experts and Restorative Justice practitioners to provide stirring personal accounts, historical and cultural context, and data to illustrate the philosophy and effectiveness of utilizing a healing approach in line with Restorative Practices to reduce violent crime and recidivism rates in communities across the country.

During the screening, viewers were invited to participate in small group discussion and share ideas among the larger audience about how we can work together to address the damage caused by a punitive justice system – an ever-expanding prison population, broken family structures, economic disenfranchisement, traumatized children, neglected victims, untreated mental health crises – and move toward a more effective, proactive approach to dealing with crime and delinquency – one that addresses the root causes of harmful behaviors and focuses on the real needs of both offenders and victims.

Wednesday’s event was well attended by community activists, leaders, scholars, and youth, as well as Kalamazoo’s County Prosecutor Jeff Getting, who is reportedly exploring the possibility of implementing Restorative Justice Programming in the local Juvenile court system. S.E.E. Change organizers hope that this is only the beginning of an ongoing dialogue and good faith collaboration between community members, criminal justice officials and elected leaders in Kalamazoo.
Those interested in joining the conversation are encouraged to connect with S.E.E. Change via facebook, or email seechangekazoo@gmail.com

More information on Healing Justice and other World Trust films can be found at www.world-trust.org/films

A complete listing of upcoming events at the Arcus Center for Social Justice is available at https://reason.kzoo.edu/csjl/

 

Kalamazoo Public Schools Approves Recommendation to Pilot Year-Round School

Kalamazoo Public Schools Approves Recommendation to Pilot Year-Round School

 Friday, January 26, 2018

Kalamazoo, MI- Each year, students in districts across the country return to the classroom after an extended summer break having lost a significant portion of academic gains made during the previous year, particularly in reading. While the effects of this yearly loss are seen among students of all backgrounds, research shows that the aptly named “Summer Slide” is a leading contributor to the widespread achievement gap between children from low-income families and their wealthier peers.

In partnership with the Kalamazoo Education Association, Kalamazoo Public Schools believes it has found a possible solution and has recommended Woodward School of Technology and Research as well as Washington Writer’s Academy as pilot schools for the program, presenting the proposal for a recommendation on Thursday.

The Summer Slide Reduction Pilot aims to reduce the number of consecutive days students spend away from the classroom by implementing a Balanced Calendar, often referred to as “year-round school”. By drastically shortening the traditional summer vacation and scheduling shorter, more frequent breaks throughout the year, supporters of the initiative hope to better enable students to retain and build on skills from year to year.

In an official statement to the Board of Education, on behalf of the Kalamazoo Education Association, KEA President Amanda Miller acknowledged the challenges that upending the traditional school year model presents to the community and stressed the importance of partnership between educators and the public to ensure a smooth transition to the new calendar. The KEA urges further research on implementation and outcomes of similar initiatives in other districts, direct collaboration between educational authorities and community members in developing a new calendar, ample opportunity for public comment, and a final community review period prior to implementation. “The Kalamazoo Education Association believes that it is only in partnership with families and the larger community that implementing a balanced calendar will be successful and yield the improved student achievement we all seek.”, the statement concluded. Full text of the KEA’s position on a Balanced Calendar is online.

The proposed recommendation for the pilot won unanimous board approval and must now be submitted to the
Michigan Department of Education for review. If given the green light from the State, the new calendar should go into effect late summer 2018 at the chosen buildings.

Other business on the agenda at Thursday’s meeting included a report by Superintendent Michael Rice on the findings of a bipartisan School Finance Research Collaborative Study, detailing the current per-pupil cost of public education and recommending an increase in state funding for all districts in Michigan, along with percentage according to the specific needs of each district’s student population. The full study is available online.

A new bond proposal, designed to help pay for numerous improvements to infrastructure, technology, and
equipment throughout the district passed unanimously among board members. Slated projects include the
addition of physical education facilities at Phoenix High School and the construction of a new building for Edison Elementary. If approved by voters in May, the bond could add an additional $96,700,000 to the district’s budget and would be, according to Superintendent Michael Rice “The largest bond in the district’s history”.

 

 

 

 

 

Kalamazoo, MI, Majyck Radio

Contributing writer-Tandy Moore

On Wednesday evening, S.E.E. Change, local advocates for Social, Economic and Educational Change in Kalamazoo, partnered with the Arcus Center for Social Justice to present a documentary film exploring our criminal justice system’s current response to, and perpetuation of, personal and intergenerational trauma, racism, and poverty in our society.

Produced and directed by Dr. Shakti Butler, Healing Justice relies on interviews with ex-offenders, victims, artists, criminal justice experts and Restorative Justice practitioners to provide stirring personal accounts, historical and cultural context, and data to illustrate the philosophy and effectiveness of utilizing a healing approach in line with Restorative Practices to reduce violent crime and recidivism rates in communities across the country.

During the screening, viewers were invited to participate in small group discussion and share ideas among the larger audience about how we can work together to address the damage caused by a punitive justice system – an ever-expanding prison population, broken family structures, economic disenfranchisement, traumatized children, neglected victims, untreated mental health crises – and move toward a more effective, proactive approach to dealing with crime and delinquency – one that addresses the root causes of harmful behaviors and focuses on the real needs of both offenders and victims.

Wednesday’s event was well attended by community activists, leaders, scholars, and youth, as well as Kalamazoo’s County Prosecutor Jeff Getting, who is reportedly exploring the possibility of implementing Restorative Justice Programming in the local Juvenile court system. S.E.E. Change organizers hope that this is only the beginning of an ongoing dialogue and good faith collaboration between community members, criminal justice officials and elected leaders in Kalamazoo.
Those interested in joining the conversation are encouraged to connect with S.E.E. Change via facebook, or email seechangekazoo@gmail.com

More information on Healing Justice and other World Trust films can be found at www.world-trust.org/films

A complete listing of upcoming events at the Arcus Center for Social Justice is available at https://reason.kzoo.edu/csjl/

 

KPS Teachers Protest Outside Administration Building

KPS Teachers Protest Outside Administration Building

Kalamazoo, MI- Prior to the start of the regularly scheduled Kalamazoo School Board, dozens of teachers, parents and community members were seen holding signs protesting outside the administration building. Standing room only, recognizing area students for their athletic achievements. The meeting’s priority for many in attendance, t step raises for teachers after one year of service. KEA, President, Amanda Miller states, “the other way teachers receive compensation increases are when we bargain an increase on the step schedule. The money budgeted doesn’t even get us to the step that teachers earn for last year’s service”.

A very emotionally charged meeting, parents and former KPS students shared their experiences of support from a  KPS teacher that “took that extra time” or provide resources to them that they were not able to get on their own at the time. Teachers current and retired shared emotionally charged stories as well. Students that were able to move past a barrier or challenge in their lives and contributing part success to the dedication of KPS teachers.

George White,  Lead parent advocate for SEE Change a local group from Kalamazoo, states, “It appears there was an agreement in principle to a 2.2 percent step increase for teachers this coming school semester.  Recruiting and retaining quality teachers depends on stability/dependability of employment and step increases after their first year to assure that teachers feel valued and are able to support their families”.  

White has met with many KPS parents and working with them to “navigate” through the “chain of commands”. In addition, White adds, “80 new teachers last year aided by a very high turnover ratio in Kalamazoo Public Schools.  Kalamazoo Public Schools enrollment is thriving/growing over the last 10 years and students received an increase in per pupil funding this school year.  It is no secret the school board has never met with teachers and this action serves to even deepen the rift. Our pupils deserve a school board that visits the schools and talks to the students/teachers and places the value where it belongs”. 

The next KPS school board is scheduled for August 31, 2017, at 7 pm. The administration building is located 1220 Howard Street.

SEE CHANGE: Community Speak Out

SEE CHANGE: Community Speak Out

Kalamazoo, MI- SEE Change, a parent/student advocacy group based in Kalamazoo held an open community speak out to hear concerns of parents, students as well as educators within the KPS school district. Many families seeking educational supports for their student shared similar stories of challenging progress toward successful resolutions.

A few KPS board members were present as well and made themselves available to parents to answer questions they may have. SEE Change is collaborating with similar organizations in Michigan to provide advocacy to parents, caregivers, and students their rights to “due process” and rights.

SEE Change plans on conducting workshops and trainings throughout the year. For more information on what this group is doing, visit them on social media

 

Protestors in Kalamazoo Rally for Health Care for All

Protestors in Kalamazoo Rally for Health Care for All

Kalamazoo, Michigan – The Upton-Long Amendment will not address the major shortfalls of the Republican Plan to repeal the ACA. The latest plan still takes away health care from 24 million people while giving $600 billion in tax breaks to the wealthiest. 

High-risk pools do not work to provide quality care for people with pre-existing conditions. Even so, $8 billion falls far short of what is needed to make high-risk pools minimally sustainable. The $8 billion reported increases represents a 6 percent increase in the $130 billion the bill already included for grants to states, funding states could use for high-risk pools. But experts have concluded that – even if all $130 billion were used for high-risk pools – that would still leave these pools underfunded by at least $200 billion (other experts have arrived at much higher estimates). Over 10 years, the $8 billion increase would be insufficient to fill the funding shortfall for Michigan, Missouri, Colorado, much less nationwide.

 Rep. Upton came out as a “NO” on the repeal plan on Tuesday, but since cutting a deal with President Trump, he has returned to supporting a bill that will kick 24 million people off of their health care. 

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Learn more about the Michigan People’s Campaign at our website: www.michiganpeoplescampaign.org

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